strategic priorities

Is your strategy right for the challenge you face?

Posted by on Apr 1, 2013

A mismatch between your strategy and the key challenge you face can spell trouble Henry Mintzberg once defined strategy as a pattern of action in response to something . . . However, many strategies lack a clear definition of that “something” . . . the challenge to which they’re responding.  We believe this often results in setting too many priorities. Why?  Read on. Why too many priorities? We recognized 20 years ago that many of our clients’ strategies included too many priorities.  How could a situation analysis with 20 to 30 strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats be focused? So...

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Realizing the promise of employee engagement

Posted by on Aug 14, 2012

Ensuring your Great Expectations don’t turn into The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly As the old joke goes, in a ham-and-eggs breakfast the chicken is involved but the pig is committed. That isn’t far off the mark for the difference between employee involvement and true employee engagement. Someone can be involved in something as a bystander, but they have to take action to be engaged. Today’s article is the first of a 3-part series for leaders who are considering making employee engagement an important part of their strategy. In today’s article – part 1 – we’ll talk about what...

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Problem solving isn’t highly overrated . . .

Posted by on May 8, 2012

. . . when you’re solving the right problems. Last week I read an article by Lorne Armstrong titled “Problem Solving is Highly Over-rated”. It tweaked my interest since much of my work involves helping leaders to clearly define, and to avoid or overcome, important strategic problems. When a blog article makes a few good, practical points that readers can use immediately, the writer has hit the mark. Armstrong succeeds. He points to common deficiencies that undermine the value of problem-solving, beginning with weak problem definition. For example, he notes that many people cite the absence...

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Two practical ways to implement your strategic priorities FAST

Posted by on Feb 29, 2012

In all my years as a management consultant, one of the funniest expressions I’ve heard is “it may work in practice, but it will never fly in theory”. Our last two articles on strategic prioritization were more theoretical and conceptual, but this week, let’s get practical. Senior managers may put a lot of effort into selecting the right strategic priorities, but it goes for naught unless they’re converted to action.  This week we’ll describe two simple, practical ways to convert your priorities to understanding throughout the organization, and most importantly, ACTION at the front lines....

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How to prioritize for faster strategy implementation

Posted by on Feb 20, 2012

The hard choices of strategic prioritization So you know you have to finally decide  Say yes to some and let the other ones ride  There’s so many choices, not all can be tried  Yes you know you have to finally decide (With apologies to the “Lovin’ Spoonful”) In last week’s article we discussed the importance of setting a few critical strategic priorities to accelerate implementation, and the reasons why teams often neglect this important step. This week we’ll set out guidelines for prioritization to help your team become very clearly focused on the most critical...

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A little-known secret to successful strategy implementation

Posted by on Feb 13, 2012

Set strategic priorities for fast implementation We all know that success requires a sound strategy that fits your know-how and resources. However, there’s an often overlooked but critical factor required for successful implementation – strategic prioritization. Strategy has always been about getting the biggest bang for the buck.  But this is different.  This is about focusing on a few of your initiatives for immediate implementation, while others await their turn. The concept is very simple, yet few senior teams do it.  Most find it difficult to narrow their priorities further than dozen...

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